Eco-conscious children’s books

Encourage an early understanding of the environment and go green with our favourite environmental reads for toddlers and children

Eco-conscious children's books
Eco-conscious children's books

Dear Greenpeace by Simon James (Walker, £5.99) Ages 3+

Advertisement

A gentle and original tale about a correspondence between a little girl who finds a whale in her pond and Greenpeace, from whom she has sought advice. Simon James’ sketchy illustrations are reminiscent of the work of Quentin Blake lending the story a quirky feel while young readers should find themselves becoming very fond of the caring, sweetly naive protagonist, Emily.

BUY HERE>>

Eco-conscious children's books

Charlie and Lola: Look After Your Planet by Lauren Child (Puffin ) Ages 3+

Charlie persuades Lola that instead of throwing her things away, she should recycle them. ‘Recycle it? What is that?’ asks Lola. With a bit of help from Charlie, Lola learns all about recycling and how it is extremely very important to look after our planet. Soon she has found an extra-specially fun way to do more recycling – and gets lots of her classmates to join in too! The perfect way to introduce the nature of recycling to younger children.

BUY HERE>>

Eco-conscious children's books

My Green Day by Melanie Walsh (Walker Books) Ages 3+

An optimistic and encouraging picture book with simple and sunny illustrations that compliment the sage advice contained within. Children of all ages can benefit from Walsh’s ten suggested activities for green living and the tone never strays into feeling overly prescriptive or patronising.

BUY HERE>>

Eco-conscious children's books

See Inside Recycling And Rubbish (Usborne) Ages 3+

A factual lift-the-flap book containing bags of information on where rubbish comes from, how different materials can be reused and what happens to the enormous amount of rubbish that isn’t recycled. Vivid, nicely detailed illustrations with touches of irreverent humour keep the tone light-hearted enough not to feel preachy.

BUY HERE>>

Eco-conscious children's books

10 Things I Can Do To Help My World by Melanie Walsh (Walker Books) Ages 2+

A second entry for Walsh on our round-up and another lovely eco-conscious book aimed at very young children. The simple tips are presented in a modern, graphic style with innovative page shapes, thought-provoking suggestions and simple explanations.

BUY HERE>>

Eco-conscious children's books

Maggie & Rose: This Book Is Totally Rubbish (Maggie and Rose) Ages 3+

A cheeky crew – Maggie, Rose, Oscar and their little dog Bentley – are getting creative in this fun activity book. Even better, they are learning their 3Rs – Reduce, Reuse, Recycle – as they repurpose rubbish to make fun new things and become Eco Superheroes into the bargain. Featuring over a dozen projects from making a superhero mask and cap out of old newspaper; making an eco train out of old cardboard boxes, and some rubbish flowers. All with simple step-by-step instructions, this “totally rubbish” book is totally brilliant!

BUY HERE>>

Eco-conscious children's books

Change The World For A Fiver from We Are What We Do (Short Books) All ages.

A simple premise nicely executed full of witty illustrations and practical items, such as a packet of seeds, which can help people of all ages to make a difference to the world. Children and adults can follow the fifty tips which encourage not only green sensibilities but ways to make other people happy such as writing a letter to someone who inspires you or learning to be friendly in another language. A genuinely altruistic book guaranteed to give readers a warm glow, and the profits go to charity to boot.

BUY HERE>>

Eco-conscious children's books

The Trouble With Dragons by Debi Gliori (Bloomsbury) Ages 3+

Advertisement

Deftly weaving an environmental message into an absorbing rhyming story about dragons, No Matter What author Gliori manages to educate as well as entertain. Bright illustrations, full of character add to the fantasy feel while the parallel the book draws between fictional dragons and real human behaviour is a great point from which to open a dialogue about green issues with your child.