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Osso Bucco And Risotto Milanese

This stew has lovely succulent meat with a tangy tomato and citrus sauce


Posted: 1 October 2008
by Junior

Osso bucco literally means ‘bone with a hole’. The meat becomes so tender, you can cut it with a spoon. With or without the gremolata – a traditional accompaniment made from garlic, parsley and grated lemon peel – it is an easy and satisfying stew.

Serves 4 adult portions

Ingredients

2 tbsp olive oil
4 large pieces of veal shin, or osso bucco with bones in – about 2kg (4 lb) in total
1 tbsp plain flour seasoned with salt and pepper
50g (2oz) butter
1 large red onion, peeled and chopped
1 stick of celery, cleaned, trimmed and chopped
2 cloves of garlic, peeled and chopped
150ml (5fl oz) white wine 
400g tin of plum tomatoes
150ml (5fl oz) beef stock
2 strips of orange peel (use a potato peeler)
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

For the risotto

2 tbsp olive oil
100g (3 oz) butter
1 Spanish onion, peeled and finely chopped
3 cloves of garlic, peeled and finely chopped
5 handfuls of risotto rice (1 per person and 1 for the pot)
150ml (5fl oz) white wine
1.5 litres (2 pints) 
chicken stock 
1 large pinch saffron threads
1 handful of freshly grated Parmesan
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

For the gremolata

2 cloves of garlic, peeled and finely chopped
Zest of 1 lemon, finely chopped
1 handful flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped

Method

Heat the oil in a pan with a lid big enough to hold the meat in one layer. Coat the meat in the seasoned flour and fry over a medium to high heat, turning once until lightly browned on both sides. Remove from pan and set aside.

Reduce heat, add butter and gently fry the onion and celery for ten minutes until the onion is soft. Add the garlic, pour in the wine and scrape the bottom of the pan with a wooden spoon to dislodge any flour that’s stuck, then simmer for five minutes. 

Throw in the tomatoes, stock and orange peel strips, giving the tomatoes a bit of a mash with the spoon. Return the meat to the pan and submerge it in the sauce. Cover the pan and leave to simmer for two hours, stirring from time to time, turning the meat and adding some water if it starts to dry out.

After about 90 minutes, start making the risotto. Heat the oil and half the butter in a large pan and gently fry the onion for about ten minutes or until soft and translucent. Stir in the garlic and rice and fry, stirring continuously, for a couple of minutes. Glug in the wine and let it bubble until it is all but evaporated. 

Meanwhile, heat the stock in a pan and keep warm. Sprinkle the saffron and a pinch of salt into the rice and stir through. Now it’s just a repetitive process, adding about a wine glass of stock and stirring until the rice has absorbed almost all of it, then adding more and repeating. 

This should continue until the rice is almost cooked, but still retaining a little bite to it. Take off the heat and, using a wooden spoon, gently beat the rest of the butter and the Parmesan into the rice and season to taste. 

When the meat is very tender and beginning to fall off the bone, it is ready to plate up. 

Mix the ingredients for the gremolata in a bowl, and sprinkle on top of the osso bucco. Serve with the risotto.

This recipe is from Sophie Conran’s Soups And Stews (Collins, £14.99).


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